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Stone Age Sailors : Paleolithic Seafaring in the Mediterranean.

By: Simmons, Alan H.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Walnut Creek : Routledge, 2016Copyright date: ©2014Description: 1 online resource (265 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781611321166.Subject(s): Paleolithic period -- Mediterranean Region.;Navigation, Prehistoric -- Mediterranean Region.;Mediterranean Region -- AntiquitiesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Stone Age Sailors : Paleolithic Seafaring in the MediterraneanDDC classification: 937 LOC classification: GN772.25 -- .S566 2014Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Intro -- Contents -- List of Figures -- List of Tables -- Acknowledgments -- Chapter 1: Neanderthals Afloat? Introduction and Research Background -- Chapter 2: A Brief History of Global Seafaring and Archaeology - Katelyn DiBenedetto and Alan H. Simmons -- Chapter 3: Environmental Considerations - Katelyn DiBenedetto and Alan H. Simmons -- Chapter 4: Of Boats, Invisible Sites, and Archaeological Method:The Difficulty of Documenting Early Seafaring Activity - Katelyn DiBenedetto and Alan H. Simmons -- Chapter 5: Pre-Neolithic Seafaring in the Mediterranean: The Claims and the Evidence -- Chapter 6: Cyprus and the Hippos -- Chapter 7: Current Developments in Cyprus since 2000 A.D -- Chapter 8: Current Developments on Other Islands -- Chapter 9: Conclusions -- References -- Index -- About the Authors.
Summary: Over the past decade, evidence has been mounting that our ancestors developed skills to sail across large bodies of water early in prehistory. In this fascinating volume, Alan Simmons summarizes and synthesizes the evidence for prehistoric seafaring and island habitation worldwide, then focuses on the Mediterranean. Recent work in Melos, Crete, and elsewhere-- as well as Simmons' own work in Cyprus-- demonstrate that long-distance sailing is a common Paleolithic phenomenon. His comprehensive presentation of the key evidence and findings will be of interest to both those interested in prehistory and those interested in ancient seafaring.
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GN772.25 -- .S566 2014 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=1716282 Available EBC1716282

Intro -- Contents -- List of Figures -- List of Tables -- Acknowledgments -- Chapter 1: Neanderthals Afloat? Introduction and Research Background -- Chapter 2: A Brief History of Global Seafaring and Archaeology - Katelyn DiBenedetto and Alan H. Simmons -- Chapter 3: Environmental Considerations - Katelyn DiBenedetto and Alan H. Simmons -- Chapter 4: Of Boats, Invisible Sites, and Archaeological Method:The Difficulty of Documenting Early Seafaring Activity - Katelyn DiBenedetto and Alan H. Simmons -- Chapter 5: Pre-Neolithic Seafaring in the Mediterranean: The Claims and the Evidence -- Chapter 6: Cyprus and the Hippos -- Chapter 7: Current Developments in Cyprus since 2000 A.D -- Chapter 8: Current Developments on Other Islands -- Chapter 9: Conclusions -- References -- Index -- About the Authors.

Over the past decade, evidence has been mounting that our ancestors developed skills to sail across large bodies of water early in prehistory. In this fascinating volume, Alan Simmons summarizes and synthesizes the evidence for prehistoric seafaring and island habitation worldwide, then focuses on the Mediterranean. Recent work in Melos, Crete, and elsewhere-- as well as Simmons' own work in Cyprus-- demonstrate that long-distance sailing is a common Paleolithic phenomenon. His comprehensive presentation of the key evidence and findings will be of interest to both those interested in prehistory and those interested in ancient seafaring.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Scholars of prehistory have been waiting for this book. The approach is global, but the focus is on the Eastern Mediterranean at least 12,000 years before the present. UNLV archaeologist Simmons and doctoral student DiBenedetto ground this book in their work on Cyprus. The authors explore and explain all aspects of seafaring before the Neolithic, clearly demonstrating that humans became sailors soon after they learned to paddle rafts. The book is a vital corollary to Cyprian Broodbank's 2013 The Making of the Middle Sea (CH, Feb'14, 51-3456). Using an empirical, theoretical approach, Simmons and DiBenedetto investigate the small sites now being uncovered, in contrast to the earlier focus on palaces. One of their book's many strengths is their step-by-step approach to putting all the pieces of the puzzle together--seamanship, currents, and winds. The work gradually turns to Simmons's four seasons of excavations on Cyprus, where he explored contacts between the pygmy hippopotamus and human culture. He discusses his own finds and what they mean, counters the critics, and concludes with the current status of the work. For methodology, explanations, and discussion of shipbuilding 12,000 to 4,000 years ago, there is not a better guide when combined with Broodbank's book. --Robin Higham, Kansas State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Alan Simmons is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology at the University of Nevada Las Vegas. He has excavated extensively in Cyprus, in the Middle East, and in the American Southwest, including heading a long-term project at the prehistoric site of Akrotiri Aetokremnos on Cyprus. Simmons is author of half a dozen books and over 150 research papers and reports on the prehistory of the Eastern Mediterranean and the Near East. His book The Neolithic Revolution in the Near East won the G Ernest Wright Book Award of the American Schools for Oriental Research.

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