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Captured : the Japanese internment of American civilians in the Philippines, 1941-1945 / Frances B. Cogan.

By: Cogan, Frances B.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Athens, Ga. : University of Georgia Press, c2000Description: xi, 357 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 0820321176 (alk. paper); 9780820321172 (alk. paper).Subject(s): World War, 1939-1945 -- Prisoners and prisons, Japanese | World War, 1939-1945 -- Concentration camps -- Philippines | Prisoners of war -- United States -- History -- 20th centuryDDC classification: 940.54/7252/09599
Contents:
Pearl of the Orient: Manila and the prewar Philippines -- First dark days -- Meanwhile, on several islands not far away -- Inside the gate: the nature of the Japanese administration of the civilian internment camps -- The Japanese soldier's ration: food and health in civilian internment camps -- Hunger time: April 1943-February 1945 -- A roof over their heads: shelter in civilian internment camps -- Idle hands are the devil's playground: work in the camps -- Angels and tanks: rescue comes.
Summary: Cogan explores the daily life in the five major internment camps held by Japan during its occupation of the Philippines, in which more than five thousand American civilians were held between 1941 and 1945.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D805.P6 C63 2000 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001481217
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D805.G3 S596 The harrowing of hell: Dachau D805.J3 F27 Bataan: D805.P6 A433 2000 All this hell : D805.P6 C63 2000 Captured : D805.P6 K36 2000 Prisoners in paradise : D805.P6 M36 2000 The butchers, the baker : D805 .P6 N67 2009 Tears in the darkness :

Includes bibliographical references (p. 337-346) and index.

Pearl of the Orient: Manila and the prewar Philippines -- First dark days -- Meanwhile, on several islands not far away -- Inside the gate: the nature of the Japanese administration of the civilian internment camps -- The Japanese soldier's ration: food and health in civilian internment camps -- Hunger time: April 1943-February 1945 -- A roof over their heads: shelter in civilian internment camps -- Idle hands are the devil's playground: work in the camps -- Angels and tanks: rescue comes.

Cogan explores the daily life in the five major internment camps held by Japan during its occupation of the Philippines, in which more than five thousand American civilians were held between 1941 and 1945.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Between December 1941 and May 1942, Japanese forces seized control of the Philippine Islands, taking more than 20,000 American military POWs and interning some 6,000 American civilians. The fate of the military POWs has received much scholarly, journalistic, and literary attention. What happened to the civilians is scarcely known. Cogan uses American and Japanese published accounts, government documents, personal interviews, and formidable analytical skills to describe the personal experiences and to examine improvisations by people forced to create communities inside the wire and walls of five camps and prisons. Incidents of brutality were common and went unpunished by occupation authorities. The paradox of wartime captivity is that one depends for survival on the enemy. As American destruction of Japanese shipping reduced food supplies to the Philippines, the internees felt the impact quickly in the form of starvation rations. Cogan refutes claims that the Japanese treated civilian internees humanely or fed them as well as Japanese soldiers (a requirement of the Geneva Convention) and points to cases when Red Cross relief packages were deliberately withheld from the intended recipients. See Van Waterford's Prisoners of the Japanese in World War II (CH, Jan'95). All levels. G. H. Davis; Georgia State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Frances B. Cogan is a professor of literature in the Honors College at the University of Oregon, Eugene.

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