Milton (Routledge Revivals) : A Study in Ideology and Form.

By: Kendrick, ChristopherMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandRoutledge Revivals: Publisher: Florence : Taylor and Francis, 2014Copyright date: ©1986Description: 1 online resource (255 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781317626411Subject(s): Literary form -- History -- 17th century | Milton, John, -- 1608-1674 -- Religion | Milton, John, -- 1608-1674. -- Areopagitica | Milton, John, -- 1608-1674. -- Paradise lost | Puritan movements in literature | Puritans -- England -- Doctrines -- History -- 17th century | Revolutionary literature, English -- Puritan authors -- History and criticismGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Milton (Routledge Revivals) : A Study in Ideology and FormDDC classification: 821.4 LOC classification: PR3592.P8 -- .K46 2014Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Original Title Page -- Original Copyright Page -- Dedication -- Table of Contents -- Acknowledgments -- 1 Introduction: reformation and ideological transition -- Part I Revolution in a pamphlet -- 2 Areopagitica: rhetoric, ethics, and the dislocation of the subject -- Disruptive heresy: Milton's soulful books as monistic figures -- Wider horizons: the Imaginary and emergent capitalism -- Milton's politics of the moment: the temperate return of reformation -- Part II The subject and primary reification -- 3 Possessive individualism, genre, and ethics -- Part III The epic of emergent capitalism: a generic construction of Paradise Lost -- 4 God: epic, hexameron, and predestinary theology -- Politics and the epic -- The epic as gesture -- Predestination -- Milton's notion of Godly narrative -- Hexameral structure -- God -- Epic hexameral: the counterplot -- 5 Satan, epic, and allegorical tragedy: predestinary ethos as desire -- Satan and evil -- Satan as epic symbol -- The neutrality of Satanic gesture -- Satanic drama -- Satan as monist -- 6 Garden and fall: predestination as metaphysical lack -- The narrative logic of paradise -- Paradisal amplification: paradise as utopia -- Theology versus ethics: the ideology of the prohibition narrative -- The ethical psychology of creation -- The fall -- Conclusion -- Notes -- Index.
Summary: First published in 1986, this title critiques the canonical view of Milton as an isolated Great Man, and reassesses the impact of the Puritan Revolution on two of his major works: the Areopagitica and Paradise Lost. The study focuses on the emergence of a discreet ethical framework of thought within the dominant theological code of these two works, arguing that this framework - integral to Protestantism - is also crucial to the construction of subjectivity under capitalism. Through an analysis of the rhetorical strategies of the Areopagitica and the generic composition of Paradise Lost, Christopher Kendrick demonstrates that Milton's 'individualism' both affirms the success of the Puritan Revolution and also exposes the contradictions between the capitalist subject's ethical freedom and the world of necessity of which that freedom is part.
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Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Original Title Page -- Original Copyright Page -- Dedication -- Table of Contents -- Acknowledgments -- 1 Introduction: reformation and ideological transition -- Part I Revolution in a pamphlet -- 2 Areopagitica: rhetoric, ethics, and the dislocation of the subject -- Disruptive heresy: Milton's soulful books as monistic figures -- Wider horizons: the Imaginary and emergent capitalism -- Milton's politics of the moment: the temperate return of reformation -- Part II The subject and primary reification -- 3 Possessive individualism, genre, and ethics -- Part III The epic of emergent capitalism: a generic construction of Paradise Lost -- 4 God: epic, hexameron, and predestinary theology -- Politics and the epic -- The epic as gesture -- Predestination -- Milton's notion of Godly narrative -- Hexameral structure -- God -- Epic hexameral: the counterplot -- 5 Satan, epic, and allegorical tragedy: predestinary ethos as desire -- Satan and evil -- Satan as epic symbol -- The neutrality of Satanic gesture -- Satanic drama -- Satan as monist -- 6 Garden and fall: predestination as metaphysical lack -- The narrative logic of paradise -- Paradisal amplification: paradise as utopia -- Theology versus ethics: the ideology of the prohibition narrative -- The ethical psychology of creation -- The fall -- Conclusion -- Notes -- Index.

First published in 1986, this title critiques the canonical view of Milton as an isolated Great Man, and reassesses the impact of the Puritan Revolution on two of his major works: the Areopagitica and Paradise Lost. The study focuses on the emergence of a discreet ethical framework of thought within the dominant theological code of these two works, arguing that this framework - integral to Protestantism - is also crucial to the construction of subjectivity under capitalism. Through an analysis of the rhetorical strategies of the Areopagitica and the generic composition of Paradise Lost, Christopher Kendrick demonstrates that Milton's 'individualism' both affirms the success of the Puritan Revolution and also exposes the contradictions between the capitalist subject's ethical freedom and the world of necessity of which that freedom is part.

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