Homeric Effects in Vergil's Narrative.

By: Barchiesi, AlessandroContributor(s): Barchiesi, Alessandro | Hardie, Philip | Marchesi, Ilaria | Fox, MattMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2015Copyright date: ©2014Description: 1 online resource (156 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781400852482Subject(s): Epic poetry, Latin -- History and criticism | Homer -- Appreciation -- Rome | Homer -- Influence | Imitation in literature | Latin poetry -- Greek influences | Narration (Rhetoric) -- History -- To 1500 | Virgil. -- AeneisGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Homeric Effects in Vergil's NarrativeDDC classification: 873.01 LOC classification: PA6931 -- .B3413 2015Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- HOMERIC EFFECTS IN VERGIL'S NARRATIVE -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Foreword -- Introductory Note -- 1 THE DEATH OF PALLAS: Intertextuality and Transformation of the Epic Model -- 2 THE STRUCTURE OF AENEID 10 -- 3 THE ARMS IN THE SKY: Diffraction of a Narrative Theme -- 4 THE DEATH OF TURNUS: Genre Model and Example Model -- APPENDIX -- APPENDIX: The Lament of Juturna -- AFTERWORD -- NOTES -- WORKS CITED -- SELECT INDEX -- SELECT INDEX LOCORUM -- INDEX OF MODERN AUTHORS.
Summary: The study of Homeric imitations in Vergil has one of the longest traditions in Western culture, starting from the very moment the Aeneid was circulated. Homeric Effects in Vergil's Narrative is the first English translation of one of the most important and influential modern studies in this tradition. In this revised and expanded edition, Alessandro Barchiesi advances innovative approaches even as he recuperates significant earlier interpretations, from Servius to G. N. Knauer. Approaching Homeric allusions in the Aeneid as "narrative effects" rather than glimpses of the creative mind of the author at work, Homeric Effects in Vergil's Narrative demonstrates how these allusions generate hesitations and questions, as well as insights and guidance, and how they participate in the creation of narrative meaning. The book also examines how layers of competing interpretations in Homer are relevant to the Aeneid, revealing again the richness of the Homeric tradition as a component of meaning in the Aeneid. Finally, Homeric Effects in Vergil's Narrative goes beyond previous studies of the Aeneid by distinguishing between two forms of Homeric intertextuality: reusing a text as an individual model or as a generic matrix. For this edition, a new chapter has been added, and in a new afterword the author puts the book in the context of changes in the study of Latin literature and intertextuality. A masterful work of classical scholarship, Homeric Effects in Vergil's Narrative also has valuable insights for the wider study of imitation, allusion, intertextuality, epic, and literary theory.
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Cover -- HOMERIC EFFECTS IN VERGIL'S NARRATIVE -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Foreword -- Introductory Note -- 1 THE DEATH OF PALLAS: Intertextuality and Transformation of the Epic Model -- 2 THE STRUCTURE OF AENEID 10 -- 3 THE ARMS IN THE SKY: Diffraction of a Narrative Theme -- 4 THE DEATH OF TURNUS: Genre Model and Example Model -- APPENDIX -- APPENDIX: The Lament of Juturna -- AFTERWORD -- NOTES -- WORKS CITED -- SELECT INDEX -- SELECT INDEX LOCORUM -- INDEX OF MODERN AUTHORS.

The study of Homeric imitations in Vergil has one of the longest traditions in Western culture, starting from the very moment the Aeneid was circulated. Homeric Effects in Vergil's Narrative is the first English translation of one of the most important and influential modern studies in this tradition. In this revised and expanded edition, Alessandro Barchiesi advances innovative approaches even as he recuperates significant earlier interpretations, from Servius to G. N. Knauer. Approaching Homeric allusions in the Aeneid as "narrative effects" rather than glimpses of the creative mind of the author at work, Homeric Effects in Vergil's Narrative demonstrates how these allusions generate hesitations and questions, as well as insights and guidance, and how they participate in the creation of narrative meaning. The book also examines how layers of competing interpretations in Homer are relevant to the Aeneid, revealing again the richness of the Homeric tradition as a component of meaning in the Aeneid. Finally, Homeric Effects in Vergil's Narrative goes beyond previous studies of the Aeneid by distinguishing between two forms of Homeric intertextuality: reusing a text as an individual model or as a generic matrix. For this edition, a new chapter has been added, and in a new afterword the author puts the book in the context of changes in the study of Latin literature and intertextuality. A masterful work of classical scholarship, Homeric Effects in Vergil's Narrative also has valuable insights for the wider study of imitation, allusion, intertextuality, epic, and literary theory.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The Italian version of this book (1984) became a classic among Latin literary theorists for its new interpretations of the influence of the Iliad and Odyssey on the Aeneid. Scholars had long noted Virgil's debt to Homer, but Barchiesi (Stanford Univ.; Univ. of Siena, Italy) was the first to show that Virgil alluded to the Homeric poems in order to comment on and develop some of his poem's most important themes. The book attained additional fame for showing how to apply intertextuality--at that time a new theoretical concept--to the study of Latin literature in general. This first English translation (which is clear and pleasant to read) will thus receive a warm welcome, and two additions increase its value beyond that of the original publication. The first of the additions is an appendix (originally published in 1978) concerning the role of the deity Juturna in the Aeneid; the second is a substantial afterword in which Barchiesi discusses important developments in similar scholarship on Virgil and literary criticism in the past 30 years. All readers of Virgil will want to peruse this book, and adherents of literary theory especially will find much in it to praise and ponder. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. --Michael Joseph Johnson, Vanderbilt University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Alessandro Barchiesi is the Gesue and Helen Spogli Professor of Italian Studies in the Department of Classics at Stanford University and professor of Latin literature at the University of Siena, Italy. He is the author of several books and the coeditor of The Oxford Handbook of Roman Studies .

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