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Women, revolution, and the novels of the 1790s / edited by Linda Lang-Peralta.

Contributor(s): Lang-Peralta, Linda.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: East Lansing : Michigan State University Press, 1999Description: xv, 192 p. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 0870135198 (alk. paper); 9780870135194 (alk. paper).Subject(s): English fiction -- 18th century -- History and criticism | Women and literature -- Great Britain -- History -- 18th century | Literature and society -- Great Britain -- History -- 18th century | France -- History -- Revolution, 1789-1799 -- Literature and the revolution | France -- History -- Revolution, 1789-1799 -- Foreign public opinion, British | Popular literature -- Great Britain -- History and criticism | English fiction -- Women authors -- History and criticism | Revolutionary literature, English -- History and criticism | France -- History -- Revolution, 1789-1799 -- InfluenceAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Women, revolution, and the novels of the 1790s.DDC classification: 820.9/006
Contents:
Women and public space in the novel of the 1790s / Catherine H. Decker -- Revolutionary domesticity in Charlotte Smith's Desmond / Katherine Binhammer -- The crowd and the public in Godwin's Caleb Williams / Carl Fisher -- Injustice in the works of Godwin and Wollstonecraft / Glynis Ridley -- Radcliffe, Godwin and self-possession in the 1790s / Barbara M. Benedict -- Lewis's The monk and the matter of reading / Clara D. McLean -- The imprisoned female body in Mary Hays's The victim of prejudice / Eleanor Ty -- Masculinity and morality in Elizabeth Inchbald's Nature and art / Shawn Lisa Maurer.
Review: "Literary historians working in the period of the late eighteenth century tend to either focus on authors of the Enlightenment or authors who were Romanticists. This collection of essays focuses on sub-genres of the novel form that evolved during the end of the century. These were novels - frequently written by women - that reflect the intersections between literature and popular culture. Using a representative reading of these works and current academic thinking on gender and class, the contributors to this volume offer a new perspective with which to view the novels of the 1790s."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PR858.W6 W66 1999 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001483197

"A colleagues book."

Includes bibliographical references (p. 177-189).

Women and public space in the novel of the 1790s / Catherine H. Decker -- Revolutionary domesticity in Charlotte Smith's Desmond / Katherine Binhammer -- The crowd and the public in Godwin's Caleb Williams / Carl Fisher -- Injustice in the works of Godwin and Wollstonecraft / Glynis Ridley -- Radcliffe, Godwin and self-possession in the 1790s / Barbara M. Benedict -- Lewis's The monk and the matter of reading / Clara D. McLean -- The imprisoned female body in Mary Hays's The victim of prejudice / Eleanor Ty -- Masculinity and morality in Elizabeth Inchbald's Nature and art / Shawn Lisa Maurer.

"Literary historians working in the period of the late eighteenth century tend to either focus on authors of the Enlightenment or authors who were Romanticists. This collection of essays focuses on sub-genres of the novel form that evolved during the end of the century. These were novels - frequently written by women - that reflect the intersections between literature and popular culture. Using a representative reading of these works and current academic thinking on gender and class, the contributors to this volume offer a new perspective with which to view the novels of the 1790s."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Lang-Peralta points out that novels of the 1790s have extravagant and marvelous shapes. Many of these novels are only now being treated to scholarly editions (and expanded readership). The contributors to this collection support the broad goal of understanding the political and polemical dimensions of the novels of the period by reading them as cultural documents and approaching them armed with the theories of Bakhtin, Althasser, Foucault, Bourdieu, et al. Especially strong are Catherine Decker's treatment of women and public space--which decodes seven ideological positions to realign understanding of the legal, moral, and social contexts of women in fiction--and Barbara Benedict's "Radcliffe, Godwin, and Self-Possession in the 1790's"--a fascinating analysis of curiosity and identity in The Mysteries of Udolpho and Caleb Williams. Carl Fisher and Glynis Ridley also analyze Caleb Williams, focusing on power relations in the novel's justice/injustice drama. Katherine Binhammer shows how Charlotte Smith underscored the public and private divide of sexuality and politics in Desmond. Clara McLean provides an ingenious analysis of the act of reading as emblematic of the unknown. And Eleanor Ty (author of Unsex'd Revolutionaries, CH. Mar'94) provides a moving reading of Mary Mays's The Victim of Prejudice. A substantive, innovate collection for upper-division undergraduates and above. ; Virginia Commonwealth University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Barbara M. Benedict, Associate Professor of English at Trinity College, Conn. <br> Katherine Binhammer is Assistant Professor in the English Department at the University of Alberta <br> Catherine H. Decker is an English instructor at Chaffey Community College in California <br> Carl Fisher is an Assistant Professor of English at Austin Peay State University <br> Linda Lang-Peralta is Assistant Professor of English at The Metropolitan State College of Denver <br> Shawn Lisa Maurer is An independent scholar. <br> Clara D. McLean is a doctoral candidate in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of California, Irvine <br> Glynis Ridley is assistant professor at the University of Huddersfield in Yorkshire, England <br> Eleanor Ty is Associate Professor of English at Wilfrid Laurier University

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