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Blue & gray in black & white : newspapers in the Civil War / Brayton Harris.

By: Harris, Brayton, 1932-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Washington, D.C. : Brassey's, c1999Edition: 1st ed.Description: xi, 365 p. : ill., 1 map ; 24 cm.ISBN: 1574881655 (alk. paper); 9781574881653 (alk. paper).Other title: Blue and gray in black and white.Subject(s): United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Press coverage | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Journalists | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Journalism, Military | American newspapers -- History -- 19th century | Journalism -- United States -- History -- 19th centuryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Blue & gray in black & white.DDC classification: 070.4/499737 LOC classification: E609 | .H37 1999
Contents:
Introduction: The War Correspondent -- State of the Art -- Rehearsals -- Sumter -- Age of Innocence -- Battle Too Soon -- Bull Run Russell -- Sedition and Suppression: North -- Sedition and Suppression: South -- Modus Scribendi -- Washington -- Command and Control -- Summer of '62 -- Matter of Color -- Press Reports a Battle: Fredericksburg, I -- Press Reports a Battle: Fredericksburg, II -- Other War -- Transitions, 1863 -- Poet as Historian, I -- Watershed -- Poet as Historian, II -- Endgame -- Coda.
Summary: Blue & Gray in Black & White is account of the techniques, tactics, and personalities of the news-gathering industry during the American Civil War. This cataclysmic event accelerated the transformation of the content of newspapers from pallid literature and opinion to robust, partisan reporting of vital events, real and imagined. The written record, however, is only part of the story. Much of the impact of Civil War journalism derives from its illustrations, and twenty-two examples of these are reproduced here. Harris also follows the war's most famous artists, including Winslow Homer, as they and their reporter brethren braved the dangers of the battlefield to capture some of our most memorable images of war.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E609 .H37 1999 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001482777
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
E608 .K3 Spies for the Blue and Gray / E609 .A6 The North reports the Civil War. E609 .A62 The South reports the Civil War / E609 .H37 1999 Blue & gray in black & white : E609 .M375 2010 Knights of the quill : E609 .R48 Editors make war : E609 .S8 1987 Bohemian Brigade :

Includes bibliographical references (p. 347-353) and index.

1. Introduction: The War Correspondent -- 2. State of the Art -- 3. Rehearsals -- 4. Sumter -- 5. Age of Innocence -- 6. Battle Too Soon -- 7. Bull Run Russell -- 8. Sedition and Suppression: North -- 9. Sedition and Suppression: South -- 10. Modus Scribendi -- 11. Washington -- 12. Command and Control -- 13. Summer of '62 -- 14. Matter of Color -- 15. Press Reports a Battle: Fredericksburg, I -- 16. Press Reports a Battle: Fredericksburg, II -- 17. Other War -- 18. Transitions, 1863 -- 19. Poet as Historian, I -- 20. Watershed -- 21. Poet as Historian, II -- 22. Endgame -- 23. Coda.

Blue & Gray in Black & White is account of the techniques, tactics, and personalities of the news-gathering industry during the American Civil War. This cataclysmic event accelerated the transformation of the content of newspapers from pallid literature and opinion to robust, partisan reporting of vital events, real and imagined. The written record, however, is only part of the story. Much of the impact of Civil War journalism derives from its illustrations, and twenty-two examples of these are reproduced here. Harris also follows the war's most famous artists, including Winslow Homer, as they and their reporter brethren braved the dangers of the battlefield to capture some of our most memorable images of war.

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Library Journal Review

Harris, a retired U.S. Navy captain and veteran freelance writer, takes his cue from a quote in the November 11, 1861 New York TimesÄ"it is opinion, not force, which determines great struggles"Äand presents a concise and well-written overview of the significant influence of the popular press during the Civil War. With the rapid rise of technological developments in communication and transportation, reports of battles from the 350 Northern and 150 Southern war correspondents "could be flashed around the nation while the guns were still firing." Harris analyzes the political philosophies of major newspapers, the often outrageous partisanship of the press and newspaper owners, suppression and censorship, and the quality of reporting, which was much livelier than official military reports and often surprisingly reliable. Harris's monograph is not as thoroughly researched as J. Cutler Andrews's dated and more scholarly volumes on the Civil War press, but it brings the role of the press in the war to vivid life. Recommended for general readers.ÄCharles C. Hay, Eastern Kentucky Univ. Archives, Richmond (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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