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Career Women in Contemporary Japan : Pursuing Identities, Fashioning Lives.

By: Aronsson, Anne Stefanie.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Routledge Contemporary Japan Series: Publisher: Florence : Taylor and Francis, 2014Copyright date: ©2014Description: 1 online resource (271 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781317686989.Subject(s): Career development -- Japan | Women -- Employment -- Japan | Women -- JapanGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Career Women in Contemporary Japan : Pursuing Identities, Fashioning LivesDDC classification: 305.40952 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Dedication -- Table of Contents -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Explanatory notes -- 1 Introduction -- Times of major transitions -- Postwar Japan - gendering the workforce and diverging paths -- Professional aspirations and career options -- Positionality in a shifting field -- Structure of the book -- 2 Women and work in modern Japan -- Identity and the shaping of white-collar career trajectories -- Japan as a neoliberal economy - critical perspectives on knowledge, power, and practice -- 3 Identity, family, and career -- Identity and selfhood -- Aspects of an aging society -- Low birth and high divorce rates -- Workforce participation of women and work-life integration -- 4 Pioneering female career tracks in Japan - women in their sixties and above -- Nomura Mihoko and others - the outliers -- Conclusion -- 5 The performative aspect of self-fulfilling prophecies - women in their fifties -- Imagawa Tomiko and Kawamori Mieko - the forerunners -- Conclusion -- 6 Through the labyrinth of their working lives - women in their forties -- Fukuyama Noriko and others - "last chance" anxieties -- Conclusion -- 7 Reevaluating the self - women in their thirties -- Kishimoto Yoshie and Fukuda Reiko - conflicting life choices -- Conclusion -- 8 Transitioning to a career - women in their twenties -- Suzuki Masako and Nagata Yoko - finding one's path in uncertain times -- Conclusion -- 9 Conclusion -- The "career woman" archetype -- Constant transitions -- Future prospects -- Appendix - list of informants -- Glossary -- Index.
Summary: Since Japan's economic recession began in the 1990s, the female workforce has experienced revolutionary changes as greater numbers of women have sought to establish careers. Employment trends indicate that increasingly white-collar professional women are succeeding in breaking through the "glass ceiling", as digital technologies blur and redefine work in spatial, gendered, and ideological terms. This book examines what motivates Japanese women to pursue professional careers in the contemporary neoliberal economy, and how they reconfigure notions of selfhood while doing so. It analyses how professional women contest conventional notions of femininity in contemporary Japan and in turn, negotiate new gender roles and cultural assumptions about women, whilst reorganizing the Japanese workplace and wider socio-economic relationships. Further, the book explores how professional women create new social identities through the mutual conditioning of structure and self, and asks how women come to understand their experiences; how their actions change the gendering of the workforce; and how their lives shape the economic, political, social, and cultural landscapes of this post-industrial nation. Based on extensive fieldwork, Career Women in Contemporary Japan will have broad appeal across a range of disciplines including Japanese culture and society, gender and family studies, women's studies, anthropology, ethnology and sociology.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HQ1762 -- .A77 2015 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=1826775 Available EBC1826775

Cover -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Dedication -- Table of Contents -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Explanatory notes -- 1 Introduction -- Times of major transitions -- Postwar Japan - gendering the workforce and diverging paths -- Professional aspirations and career options -- Positionality in a shifting field -- Structure of the book -- 2 Women and work in modern Japan -- Identity and the shaping of white-collar career trajectories -- Japan as a neoliberal economy - critical perspectives on knowledge, power, and practice -- 3 Identity, family, and career -- Identity and selfhood -- Aspects of an aging society -- Low birth and high divorce rates -- Workforce participation of women and work-life integration -- 4 Pioneering female career tracks in Japan - women in their sixties and above -- Nomura Mihoko and others - the outliers -- Conclusion -- 5 The performative aspect of self-fulfilling prophecies - women in their fifties -- Imagawa Tomiko and Kawamori Mieko - the forerunners -- Conclusion -- 6 Through the labyrinth of their working lives - women in their forties -- Fukuyama Noriko and others - "last chance" anxieties -- Conclusion -- 7 Reevaluating the self - women in their thirties -- Kishimoto Yoshie and Fukuda Reiko - conflicting life choices -- Conclusion -- 8 Transitioning to a career - women in their twenties -- Suzuki Masako and Nagata Yoko - finding one's path in uncertain times -- Conclusion -- 9 Conclusion -- The "career woman" archetype -- Constant transitions -- Future prospects -- Appendix - list of informants -- Glossary -- Index.

Since Japan's economic recession began in the 1990s, the female workforce has experienced revolutionary changes as greater numbers of women have sought to establish careers. Employment trends indicate that increasingly white-collar professional women are succeeding in breaking through the "glass ceiling", as digital technologies blur and redefine work in spatial, gendered, and ideological terms. This book examines what motivates Japanese women to pursue professional careers in the contemporary neoliberal economy, and how they reconfigure notions of selfhood while doing so. It analyses how professional women contest conventional notions of femininity in contemporary Japan and in turn, negotiate new gender roles and cultural assumptions about women, whilst reorganizing the Japanese workplace and wider socio-economic relationships. Further, the book explores how professional women create new social identities through the mutual conditioning of structure and self, and asks how women come to understand their experiences; how their actions change the gendering of the workforce; and how their lives shape the economic, political, social, and cultural landscapes of this post-industrial nation. Based on extensive fieldwork, Career Women in Contemporary Japan will have broad appeal across a range of disciplines including Japanese culture and society, gender and family studies, women's studies, anthropology, ethnology and sociology.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Anthropologist Aronsson conducted extensive interviews between 2007 and 2010 with over 100 "career women" in Japanese financial institutions, industrial companies, the National Diet, and universities. She distills her findings into a small number of ethnographic vignettes, situating her work in the existing literature on the Japanese housewife. There is some slippage in her writing between her informants' expressions of loneliness, regret, anxiety, and depression and her authorial assertions that the women were, in fact, clinically depressed or lacking in maternal feelings. Aronsson overstates the novelty of her informants' careers, never acknowledging the career paths--medicine, nursing, midwifery, teaching, and journalism--women pursued throughout the 20th century or the positions in the bureaucracy and the legal profession that opened to women in the postwar period. Frequent invocation of neoliberalism as an explanation for women's career opportunities obscures both the constitutional guarantee of gender equality in postwar Japan and the role of the women's movement in removing obstacles to women's careers. The book provides new information on women in the financial field, but analysis of such a wide range of career options over such a long period stretches the data thin. Summing Up: Optional. Graduate students and faculty. --Sally Ann Hastings, Purdue University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Anne Stefanie Aronsson holds a PhD in Anthropology from Yale University, USA

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