Recovered writers/recovered texts : race, class, and gender in Black women's literature / edited by Dolan Hubbard.

Contributor(s): Hubbard, Dolan, 1949-Material type: TextTextSeries: Tennessee studies in literature: v. 38.Publisher: Knoxville : University of Tennessee Press, c1997Edition: 1st edDescription: xxiii, 171 p. ; 24 cmISBN: 0870499599 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780870499593 (cloth : alk. paper)Subject(s): Feminist literary criticism | Feminism and literature | Literature -- Black authors -- History and criticism | Literature -- Women authors -- History and criticism | Women, Black -- Intellectual life | Women, Black, in literature | Women and literatureDDC classification: 809/.89287/0896073 LOC classification: PN98.W64 | R44 1997PS1 | .T43 v.38Other classification: 17.89
Contents:
Introduction : Can I get a witness? / Dolan Hubbard -- Witnesses and practitioners : attitudes toward miscegenation in Barbara Chase-Riboud's Sally Hemings / Emma Waters Dawson -- The two Marys (Prince and Shelley) on the textual meeting ground of race, gender, and genre / Helena Woodard -- Harriet Wilson's Our nig : the demystification of sentiment / Debra Walker King -- Gender, genre, and vulgar secularism : the case of Frances Ellen Watkins Harper and the AME Press / Frances Smith Foster -- Anna J. Cooper : the international dimensions / David W.H. Pellow -- The "invisible woman" abroad : Jessie Fauset's New horizon / Erica L. Griffin -- A blend of voices : composite narrative strategies in biographical reconstruction / Sandra Y. Govan -- Before the stigma of race : authority and witchcraft in Ann Petry's Tituba of Salem Village / Trudier Harris -- Reading Ann Petry's The narrows into Black literary tradition / Joyce Pettis -- The unmasking of Virginia Brindis de Salas : minority discourse of Afro-Uruguay / Caroll Mills Young.
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PS1 .T43 V.38 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001227164

Includes bibliographical references (p. [153]-161) and index.

Introduction : Can I get a witness? / Dolan Hubbard -- Witnesses and practitioners : attitudes toward miscegenation in Barbara Chase-Riboud's Sally Hemings / Emma Waters Dawson -- The two Marys (Prince and Shelley) on the textual meeting ground of race, gender, and genre / Helena Woodard -- Harriet Wilson's Our nig : the demystification of sentiment / Debra Walker King -- Gender, genre, and vulgar secularism : the case of Frances Ellen Watkins Harper and the AME Press / Frances Smith Foster -- Anna J. Cooper : the international dimensions / David W.H. Pellow -- The "invisible woman" abroad : Jessie Fauset's New horizon / Erica L. Griffin -- A blend of voices : composite narrative strategies in biographical reconstruction / Sandra Y. Govan -- Before the stigma of race : authority and witchcraft in Ann Petry's Tituba of Salem Village / Trudier Harris -- Reading Ann Petry's The narrows into Black literary tradition / Joyce Pettis -- The unmasking of Virginia Brindis de Salas : minority discourse of Afro-Uruguay / Caroll Mills Young.

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CHOICE Review

Recognizing the feminization of African American literary scholarship, this collection of essays attempts to widen the discussion to encompass a Pan-American perspective on black women writers. In addition to articles on "recovered" writers Harriet Wilson (by Debra Walker King) and Frances E.W. Harper (by Frances Smith Foster), the volume includes essays on the slave narrative of Bermudan/Antiguan writer Mary Prince (compellingly read against Mary Shelley's Frankenstein by Helena Woodard) and the Afro-Uruguayan poet Virginia Brindis de Salas (by Caroll Mills Young). Essays by David W.H. Pellow and Erica L. Griffin redirect attention to the international interests of Anna Julia Cooper and Jessie Fauset. Part of the subtext of the volume is reflected in its title: the politics of giving voice to forgotten black women writers. Sandra Y. Govan contributes an illuminating essay on her efforts to reclaim and reconstruct the biography of poet Gwendolyn Bennet, and Trudier Harris asks readers to reconsider Ann Petry's dismissed "adolescent" novel Tituba of Salem Village (1964). Hubbard's introduction provides an overview of black feminist critics, and the footnotes are extremely useful. Graduates; researchers; faculty. D. J. Rosenthal; Case Western Reserve University

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