Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Seeking victory on the western front : the British army and chemical warfare in World War I / Albert Palazzo.

By: Palazzo, Albert, 1957-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Lincoln, Neb. : University of Nebraska Press, c2000Description: xii, 239 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0803237251 (alk. paper); 9780803237254 (alk. paper).Subject(s): World War, 1914-1918 -- Chemical warfare -- Great Britain | Great Britain. Army -- History -- World War, 1914-1918Additional physical formats: Online version:: Seeking victory on the western front.DDC classification: 940.4/144 Other classification: 15.70
Contents:
Confronting the western front -- Introduction and reaction -- Experimentation -- Institutionalization -- March to victory.
Review: "Seeking Victory on the Western Front examines how, in the face of the devastating firepower advantages that modern weapons offered the Germans, the British army developed the means to reclaim the offense and break the stalemate of the western front to defeat their enemy. Within this context, Albert Palazzo demonstrates the importance of gas warfare to Britain's tactical success and argues that it was a much more efficient weapon than past historians have suggested. Despite British notions of tradition, gentlemanly conduct, and fair fighting, the high command realized that the war was to be won by employing new technologies and techniques to counteract the defensive advantages their well-fortified and entrenched opponent enjoyed on the western front. Through his study of the evolution of chemical warfare, Palazzo demonstrates that the British made the necessary transformation by successfully incorporating new weapons and tactics into their existing method of waging war."--BOOK JACKET.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D639.C39 P35 2000 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001483726

Includes bibliographical references (p. [201]-232) and index.

Confronting the western front -- Introduction and reaction -- Experimentation -- Institutionalization -- March to victory.

"Seeking Victory on the Western Front examines how, in the face of the devastating firepower advantages that modern weapons offered the Germans, the British army developed the means to reclaim the offense and break the stalemate of the western front to defeat their enemy. Within this context, Albert Palazzo demonstrates the importance of gas warfare to Britain's tactical success and argues that it was a much more efficient weapon than past historians have suggested. Despite British notions of tradition, gentlemanly conduct, and fair fighting, the high command realized that the war was to be won by employing new technologies and techniques to counteract the defensive advantages their well-fortified and entrenched opponent enjoyed on the western front. Through his study of the evolution of chemical warfare, Palazzo demonstrates that the British made the necessary transformation by successfully incorporating new weapons and tactics into their existing method of waging war."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Palazzo's excellent study of the last months of WW I challenges the anti-Haig views of such critics as Denis Winter (Haig's Command, CH, Apr'92) and Tim Travers (How the War Was Won, CH, Feb'93). Palazzo (Australian Defense Force Academy) argues that Haig, British commander in chief, knew there was no easy, cheap way to victory. The British realized that they had to devise new techniques and weapons to break through the German trench line. In 1918 the British army brought together tanks, heavy artillery, planes, and chemical warfare and combined these into a well-organized military force that defeated the German army in the 100 days from August to November. Although recognizing that victory was a result of the amalgamation of all these new weapons, Palazzo claims that the use of gas was decisive and much more important than usually admitted. Most historians emphasize strategy and tactics, but Palazzo points out that the new weapons that proved decisive required long-term planning and industrial organization in which the British proved superior. Illustrations, tables, footnotes. Highly recommended for academic libraries with WW I collections. Upper-division undergraduates and above. I. M. Roth; Foothill College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Albert Palazzo is a research associate in the School of History of the Australian Defense Force Academy.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.