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The wife of Bath / Geoffrey Chaucer ; edited by Peter G. Beidler.

By: Chaucer, Geoffrey, d. 1400.
Contributor(s): Beidler, Peter G.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Case studies in contemporary criticism: Publisher: Boston : Bedford Books of St. Martin's Press, c1996Description: xiii, 306 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.ISBN: 0312158599 (hardcover); 9780312158590 (hardcover); 0312111282 (pbk.); 9780312111281 (pbk.); 0333657063 (pbk.); 9780333657065 (pbk.); 0312142013; 9780312142018.Contained works: Chaucer, Geoffrey, d. 1400. Wife of Bath's tale.Subject(s): Arthurian romances | Wife of Bath (Fictitious character) -- Poetry | Chaucer, Geoffrey, d. 1400 -- Characters -- Wife of Bath | Chaucer, Geoffrey, d. 1400 -- Characters -- Women | Arthurian romances -- History and criticism | Man-woman relationships in literature | Knights and knighthood in literature | Wife of Bath (Fictitious character) | Marriage in literature | Women in literature | Rape in literature | English poetryDDC classification: 821/.1 Other classification: 18.05
Contents:
pt. 1. The Wife of Bath: The Complete Text -- pt. 2. The Wife of Bath: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism. A Critical History of the Wife of Bath's Prologue and Tale. The New Historicism and the Wife of Bath. Marxist Criticism and the Wife of Bath. Psychoanalytic Criticism and the Wife of Bath. Deconstruction and the Wife of Bath. Feminist Criticism and the Wife of Bath.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book Longview campus
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PR1868.W592 B45 1996 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001721943
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PR1868.W592 B45 1996 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001483759

"Complete, authoritative text with biographical and historical contexts, critical history, and essays from five contemporary critical perspectives."

Includes bibliographical references.

pt. 1. The Wife of Bath: The Complete Text -- pt. 2. The Wife of Bath: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism. A Critical History of the Wife of Bath's Prologue and Tale. The New Historicism and the Wife of Bath. Marxist Criticism and the Wife of Bath. Psychoanalytic Criticism and the Wife of Bath. Deconstruction and the Wife of Bath. Feminist Criticism and the Wife of Bath.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Geoffrey Chaucer, one of England's greatest poets, was born in London about 1340, the son of a wine merchant and deputy to the king's butler and his wife Agnes. Not much is known of Chaucer's early life and education, other than he learned to read French, Latin, and Italian. His experiences as a civil servant and diplomat are said to have developed his fascination with people and his knowledge of English life. <p> In 1359-1360 Chaucer traveled with King Edward III's army to France during the Hundred Years' War and was captured in Ardennes. He returned to England after the Treaty of Bretigny when the King paid his ransom. In 1366 he married Philippa Roet, one of Queen Philippa's ladies, who gave him two sons and two daughters. <p> Chaucer remained in royal service traveling to Flanders, Italy, and Spain. These travels would all have a great influence on his work. His early writing was influenced by the French tradition of courtly love poetry, and his later work by the Italians, especially Dante, Boccaccio, and Petrarch. <p> Chaucer wrote in Middle English, the form of English used from 1100 to about 1485. He is given the designation of the first English poet to use rhymed couplets in iambic pentameter and to compose successfully in the vernacular. <p> Chaucer's Canterbury Tales is a collection of humorous, bawdy, and poignant stories told by a group of fictional pilgrims traveling to the shrine of St. Thomas a Becket. It is considered to be among the masterpieces of literature. His works also include The Book of the Duchess, inspired by the death of John Gaunt's first wife; House of Fame, The Parliament of Fowls, and The Legend of Good Women. Troilus and Criseyde, adapted from a love story by Boccaccio, is one of his greatest poems apart from The Canterbury Tales. <p> Chaucer died in London on October 25, 1400. He was buried in Westminster Abbey, in what is now called Poet's Corner. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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