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A Social Geography of England and Wales : Pergamon Oxford Geographies.

By: Dennis, Richard.
Contributor(s): Clout, Hugh | Fisher, W. B.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Pergamon Oxford Geographies: Publisher: Kent : Elsevier Science & Technology, 2013Copyright date: ©1980Description: 1 online resource (217 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781483150369.Subject(s): England -- Historical geography | England -- Social conditions | Human geography -- England | Human geography -- Wales | Wales -- Historical geography | Wales -- Social conditionsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: A Social Geography of England and Wales : Pergamon Oxford GeographiesDDC classification: 942 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Front Cover -- A Social Geography of England and Wales -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- Preface -- Chapter 1. An Introduction -- Through the Looking-glass -- References and Further Reading -- Chapter 2. Theories of Industrialization and Urbanization -- Approaches -- Traditional and Modern Societies -- Urbanism as a Way of Life -- Social Area Theory -- Marx and Engels on Residential Differentiation -- References and Further Reading -- Chapter 3. Pre-Industrial England -- Introduction -- Families and Households -- The Community -- Urban Life and Institutions -- London as a Pre-industrial City -- The Demise of Pre-industrial England -- References and Further Reading -- Chapter 4. The Modernization of English Society -- Population Change -- Rural Life in Victorian England -- Migration in Victorian England -- Industrialization -- References and Further Reading -- Chapter 5. Social Patterns in Nineteenth-Century Cities -- Contemporary Observations -- Segregation in Victorian Cities -- Migrant Populations -- Class and Status -- Transport -- Housing -- Spatial Structure -- References and Further Reading -- Chapter 6. Structural Models of English Cities -- Introduction -- Ecological Theory -- Micro-Economic Theory -- Alternative Geometries -- References and Further Reading -- Chapter 7. Segregation and Patterns of Behaviour in Urban Areas -- Residential Segregation -- Neighbourhood and Behaviour -- Residential Mobility -- References and Further Reading -- Chapter 8. The Geography of Housing in England and Wales -- The Provision of Housing -- Changes in Tenure -- Tenure and Status -- A Theory of Housing Classes -- Tenure and Location -- Location and Status -- Housing and Mobility -- Some Final Comments -- References and Further Reading -- Chapter 9. The Inner City -- Recognizing the Problems -- Social Disorganization in the Inner City.
Weil-Being -- Race and the Inner City -- Economy and Environment -- Government Policy -- References and Further Reading -- Chapter 10. Beyond the Fringe -- The Fringe in Context -- Social and Spatial Processes Beyond the Fringe: Commuting -- Hobby Farming and Retirement Migration -- Second Homes and Tourism -- The Challenge of Interpreting Social Change -- References and Further Reading -- Chapter 11. Social Geography and Relevance -- Weil-Being -- Relevance -- References and Further Reading -- Index.
Summary: A Social Geography of England and Wales considers the theoretical concepts of the social geography of England and Wales. This book is composed of 11 chapters that discuss the theories of industrialization and urbanization. The opening chapters deal with the origins and settlement of English people, as well as the workings of feudal society with its hierarchy of groups of different legal status, ranging from the king through the base of the system. The succeeding chapters examine the vital formative phase in British social history. Other chapters explore the strengths and weaknesses of several ecological and economic models of urban structure that are transported from North America to Great Britain. A chapter looks into the variations in housing type and quality form intriguing reflections of fundamental differences in British Society based on a theory of housing classes. This text also surveys residents of the inner areas of many British cities now experience substantial social problems, which are compounded in areas of multiple deprivation. The final chapters cover the dispersion of urbanism into the countryside where it has provoked fundamental social and spatial changes related to commuting, retirement migration and tourism. This book is of value to historians, sociologists, researchers, and undergraduate students.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
GF551 -- .D46 1980 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=1874538 Available EBC1874538

Front Cover -- A Social Geography of England and Wales -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- Preface -- Chapter 1. An Introduction -- Through the Looking-glass -- References and Further Reading -- Chapter 2. Theories of Industrialization and Urbanization -- Approaches -- Traditional and Modern Societies -- Urbanism as a Way of Life -- Social Area Theory -- Marx and Engels on Residential Differentiation -- References and Further Reading -- Chapter 3. Pre-Industrial England -- Introduction -- Families and Households -- The Community -- Urban Life and Institutions -- London as a Pre-industrial City -- The Demise of Pre-industrial England -- References and Further Reading -- Chapter 4. The Modernization of English Society -- Population Change -- Rural Life in Victorian England -- Migration in Victorian England -- Industrialization -- References and Further Reading -- Chapter 5. Social Patterns in Nineteenth-Century Cities -- Contemporary Observations -- Segregation in Victorian Cities -- Migrant Populations -- Class and Status -- Transport -- Housing -- Spatial Structure -- References and Further Reading -- Chapter 6. Structural Models of English Cities -- Introduction -- Ecological Theory -- Micro-Economic Theory -- Alternative Geometries -- References and Further Reading -- Chapter 7. Segregation and Patterns of Behaviour in Urban Areas -- Residential Segregation -- Neighbourhood and Behaviour -- Residential Mobility -- References and Further Reading -- Chapter 8. The Geography of Housing in England and Wales -- The Provision of Housing -- Changes in Tenure -- Tenure and Status -- A Theory of Housing Classes -- Tenure and Location -- Location and Status -- Housing and Mobility -- Some Final Comments -- References and Further Reading -- Chapter 9. The Inner City -- Recognizing the Problems -- Social Disorganization in the Inner City.

Weil-Being -- Race and the Inner City -- Economy and Environment -- Government Policy -- References and Further Reading -- Chapter 10. Beyond the Fringe -- The Fringe in Context -- Social and Spatial Processes Beyond the Fringe: Commuting -- Hobby Farming and Retirement Migration -- Second Homes and Tourism -- The Challenge of Interpreting Social Change -- References and Further Reading -- Chapter 11. Social Geography and Relevance -- Weil-Being -- Relevance -- References and Further Reading -- Index.

A Social Geography of England and Wales considers the theoretical concepts of the social geography of England and Wales. This book is composed of 11 chapters that discuss the theories of industrialization and urbanization. The opening chapters deal with the origins and settlement of English people, as well as the workings of feudal society with its hierarchy of groups of different legal status, ranging from the king through the base of the system. The succeeding chapters examine the vital formative phase in British social history. Other chapters explore the strengths and weaknesses of several ecological and economic models of urban structure that are transported from North America to Great Britain. A chapter looks into the variations in housing type and quality form intriguing reflections of fundamental differences in British Society based on a theory of housing classes. This text also surveys residents of the inner areas of many British cities now experience substantial social problems, which are compounded in areas of multiple deprivation. The final chapters cover the dispersion of urbanism into the countryside where it has provoked fundamental social and spatial changes related to commuting, retirement migration and tourism. This book is of value to historians, sociologists, researchers, and undergraduate students.

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