Reporting U.S.-European Relations : Four Nations, Four Newspapers.

By: Carr, JonathanContributor(s): Pierre, Henri | Rice, Michael | Rice, Michael | Cooney, James AMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Kent : Elsevier Science, 2014Copyright date: ©1982Description: 1 online resource (153 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781483150000Subject(s): Europe -- Foreign relations -- United States | Foreign news | Journalism -- Political aspects | Newspapers | United States -- Foreign relations -- EuropeGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Reporting U.S.-European Relations : Four Nations, Four NewspapersDDC classification: 070.433 LOC classification: PN4784.F6 -- .R4 1982Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Front Cover -- Reporting U.S.-European Relations: Four Nations, Four Newspapers -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- PREFACE -- ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS -- INTRODUCTION -- chapter 1. FRANKFURTER ALLGEMEINE ZEITUNG: The World At Length -- Background -- Assessment -- The Schmidt-FAZ Affair -- The FAZ's Influence -- The FAZ's Governance -- chapter 2. THE NEW YORK TIMES: Making Importance Popular -- Relations with the Soviet Union -- Relations with Eastern Europe -- Relations with the United Kingdom -- Relations with France -- Relations with Southern and Southeastern Europe -- Relations with Scandinavia -- Editorials -- Conclusion -- Choosing What to Cover -- Correspondents' Performance -- chapter 3. The Times (London): News as Literature -- A Technical Appreciation -- A General Appreciation of Editorial Comment and Special Articles -- Reporting and Opinion -- Labeling the Difference -- Prospects -- chapter 4. LE MONDE: De Gaulle's Only Legitimate Heir -- Brief History -- Le Monde's View of U.S-European and U.S.-French Relations -- U.S-Europe, U.S-France, Finlandization -- U.S.-Iran -- The Afghanistan Crisis and the Olympic Games Boycott -- The Americans, American Culture, and the English (American) Language -- The Middle East -- World Economic Picture -- Response to Salinger -- Reporting on Germany -- Tributes -- INDEX -- ABOUT THE AUTHORS.
Summary: Reporting U.S.-European Relations: Four Nations, Four Newspapers is a compilation of U.S. and European perspectives from different daily newspapers. Chapter 1 is about the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung (FAZ). After a brief background of the newspaper, from one dictator to another, the paper is described as having no editor. The political, economic, and cultural policies are made by ""editor-publishers."" Political philosophy in the FAZ is very cohesive and conservative, which readers of a wide political spectrum rely upon. Chapter 2 deals with the New York Times, which is founded in 1851 and has undergone many changes, making it the most respected daily newspaper in the United States. This circulation is considered a chronologist of current events, and more than an opinion maker, it is also considered an educator. Chapter 3 is about The Times (London), founded in 1785 under a different name. This circulation is one of the most influential newspapers in the world, with a succession of notable editors. Considered by some as boring, this newspaper is bought by Rupert Murdoch, making it still in substance a uniquely British expression of life. Chapter 4 is about Le Monde, founded in December 1944 upon the request of General Charles de Gaulle. This circulation is considered the most important and prestigious daily newspaper in France, very nationalistic, and a receptacle for debate. This collection of essays will prove invaluable to practicing journalists, politicians, public and government leaders, and students of journalism. Writers and authors will also find this collection entertaining and informative.
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PN4784.F6 -- .R4 1982 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=1874800 Available EBC1874800

Front Cover -- Reporting U.S.-European Relations: Four Nations, Four Newspapers -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- PREFACE -- ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS -- INTRODUCTION -- chapter 1. FRANKFURTER ALLGEMEINE ZEITUNG: The World At Length -- Background -- Assessment -- The Schmidt-FAZ Affair -- The FAZ's Influence -- The FAZ's Governance -- chapter 2. THE NEW YORK TIMES: Making Importance Popular -- Relations with the Soviet Union -- Relations with Eastern Europe -- Relations with the United Kingdom -- Relations with France -- Relations with Southern and Southeastern Europe -- Relations with Scandinavia -- Editorials -- Conclusion -- Choosing What to Cover -- Correspondents' Performance -- chapter 3. The Times (London): News as Literature -- A Technical Appreciation -- A General Appreciation of Editorial Comment and Special Articles -- Reporting and Opinion -- Labeling the Difference -- Prospects -- chapter 4. LE MONDE: De Gaulle's Only Legitimate Heir -- Brief History -- Le Monde's View of U.S-European and U.S.-French Relations -- U.S-Europe, U.S-France, Finlandization -- U.S.-Iran -- The Afghanistan Crisis and the Olympic Games Boycott -- The Americans, American Culture, and the English (American) Language -- The Middle East -- World Economic Picture -- Response to Salinger -- Reporting on Germany -- Tributes -- INDEX -- ABOUT THE AUTHORS.

Reporting U.S.-European Relations: Four Nations, Four Newspapers is a compilation of U.S. and European perspectives from different daily newspapers. Chapter 1 is about the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung (FAZ). After a brief background of the newspaper, from one dictator to another, the paper is described as having no editor. The political, economic, and cultural policies are made by ""editor-publishers."" Political philosophy in the FAZ is very cohesive and conservative, which readers of a wide political spectrum rely upon. Chapter 2 deals with the New York Times, which is founded in 1851 and has undergone many changes, making it the most respected daily newspaper in the United States. This circulation is considered a chronologist of current events, and more than an opinion maker, it is also considered an educator. Chapter 3 is about The Times (London), founded in 1785 under a different name. This circulation is one of the most influential newspapers in the world, with a succession of notable editors. Considered by some as boring, this newspaper is bought by Rupert Murdoch, making it still in substance a uniquely British expression of life. Chapter 4 is about Le Monde, founded in December 1944 upon the request of General Charles de Gaulle. This circulation is considered the most important and prestigious daily newspaper in France, very nationalistic, and a receptacle for debate. This collection of essays will prove invaluable to practicing journalists, politicians, public and government leaders, and students of journalism. Writers and authors will also find this collection entertaining and informative.

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