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Remembering the First World War.

By: Ziino, Bart.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Remembering the Modern World: Publisher: Florence : Taylor and Francis, 2014Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (540 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781317573715.Subject(s): Collective memory | Memorialization | War memorials | World War, 1914-1918 -- Archives | World War, 1914-1918 -- Literature and the war | World War, 1914-1918 -- Motion pictures and the war | World War, 1914-1918 -- MuseumsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Remembering the First World WarDDC classification: 940.3 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- List of figures -- Series editors' foreword -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction: Remembering the First World War today -- PART 1 Family history, genealogy and the First World War -- 1. 'Great-grandfather, what did you do in the Great War?': The phenomenon of conducting First World War family history research -- 2. Family history and the Great War in Australia -- PART 2 Practices of remembering -- 3. Framing the Great War in Britain: Modern mediated memories -- 4. Teaching and remembrance in English secondary schools -- 5. Museums, architects and artists on the Western Front: New commemoration for a new history? -- 6. Music and remembrance: Britain and the First World War -- PART 3 The return of the war -- 7. 'Now Russia returns its history to itself: Russia celebrates the centenary of the First World War -- 8. Çanakkale's children: The politics of remembering the Gallipoli campaign in contemporary Turkey -- 9. Commemoration and the hazards of Irish politics -- 10. Little Flemish Heroes' Tombstones: The Great War and twenty-first century Belgian politics -- 11. Between the topos of a 'forgotten war' and the current memory boom: Remembering the First World War in Austria -- Afterword -- Index.
Summary: Remembering the First World War brings together a group of international scholars to understand how and why the past quarter of a century has witnessed such an extraordinary increase in global popular and academic interest in the First World War, both as an event and in the ways it is remembered.  The book discusses this phenomenon across three key areas. The first section looks at family history, genealogy and the First World War, seeking to understand the power of family history in shaping and reshaping remembrance of the War at the smallest levels, as well as popular media and the continuing role of the state and its agencies. The second part discusses practices of remembering and the more public forms of representation and negotiation through film, literature, museums, monuments and heritage sites, focusing on agency in representing and remembering war. The third section covers the return of the War and the increasing determination among individuals to acknowledge and participate in public rituals of remembrance with their own contemporary politics. What, for instance, does it mean to wear a poppy on armistice/remembrance day? How do symbols like this operate today? These chapters will investigate these aspects through a series of case studies. Placing remembrance of the First World War in its longer historical and broader transnational context and including illustrations and an afterword by Professor David Reynolds, this is the ideal book for all those interested in the history of the Great War and its aftermath.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
D503 -- .R46 2015 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=1883857 Available EBC1883857

Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- List of figures -- Series editors' foreword -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction: Remembering the First World War today -- PART 1 Family history, genealogy and the First World War -- 1. 'Great-grandfather, what did you do in the Great War?': The phenomenon of conducting First World War family history research -- 2. Family history and the Great War in Australia -- PART 2 Practices of remembering -- 3. Framing the Great War in Britain: Modern mediated memories -- 4. Teaching and remembrance in English secondary schools -- 5. Museums, architects and artists on the Western Front: New commemoration for a new history? -- 6. Music and remembrance: Britain and the First World War -- PART 3 The return of the war -- 7. 'Now Russia returns its history to itself: Russia celebrates the centenary of the First World War -- 8. Çanakkale's children: The politics of remembering the Gallipoli campaign in contemporary Turkey -- 9. Commemoration and the hazards of Irish politics -- 10. Little Flemish Heroes' Tombstones: The Great War and twenty-first century Belgian politics -- 11. Between the topos of a 'forgotten war' and the current memory boom: Remembering the First World War in Austria -- Afterword -- Index.

Remembering the First World War brings together a group of international scholars to understand how and why the past quarter of a century has witnessed such an extraordinary increase in global popular and academic interest in the First World War, both as an event and in the ways it is remembered.  The book discusses this phenomenon across three key areas. The first section looks at family history, genealogy and the First World War, seeking to understand the power of family history in shaping and reshaping remembrance of the War at the smallest levels, as well as popular media and the continuing role of the state and its agencies. The second part discusses practices of remembering and the more public forms of representation and negotiation through film, literature, museums, monuments and heritage sites, focusing on agency in representing and remembering war. The third section covers the return of the War and the increasing determination among individuals to acknowledge and participate in public rituals of remembrance with their own contemporary politics. What, for instance, does it mean to wear a poppy on armistice/remembrance day? How do symbols like this operate today? These chapters will investigate these aspects through a series of case studies. Placing remembrance of the First World War in its longer historical and broader transnational context and including illustrations and an afterword by Professor David Reynolds, this is the ideal book for all those interested in the history of the Great War and its aftermath.

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