000 04108cam a2200565 a 4500
001 ocm81860711
008 070124s2007 ncub b s001 0 eng
010 _a 2007003201
040 _aDLC
_beng
_cDLC
_dBTCTA
_dBAKER
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_dYDXCP
_dTSU
_dTBS
_dYOM
_dTTU
_dMRH
_dOCLCQ
_dHEBIS
_dDEBBG
_dOCL
_dIBV
_dOCLCQ
_dALAUL
_dBDX
019 _a317929540
020 _a9780807831038 (cloth : alk. paper)
020 _a0807831034 (cloth : alk. paper)
020 _a9780807861790 (pbk.)
020 _a0807861790 (pbk.)
029 1 _aAU@
_b000041249042
029 1 _aNZ1
_b11228762
029 1 _aHEBIS
_b195217497
029 1 _aDEBBG
_bBV023285205
029 1 _aCHVBK
_b068093772
035 _a(OCoLC)81860711
_z(OCoLC)317929540
043 _an-us-ms
_an-usu--
050 0 0 _aE445.M6
_bK29 2007
082 0 0 _a307.3/36208996073076226
_222
084 _aNW 8295
_2rvk
049 _aTEXA
100 1 _aKaye, Anthony E.
245 1 0 _aJoining places :
_bslave neighborhoods in the old South /
_cAnthony E. Kaye.
260 _aChapel Hill :
_bUniversity of North Carolina Press,
_cc2007.
300 _ax, 365 p. :
_bmaps ;
_c25 cm.
490 1 _aThe John Hope Franklin series in African American history and culture
504 _aIncludes bibliographical references (p. [311]-342) and index.
505 0 _aNeighborhoods -- Intimate relations -- Divisions of labor -- Terrains of struggle -- Beyond neighborhood -- War and emancipation -- Appendix: Population, land, and labor.
520 _a"In this new interpretation of antebellum slavery, Anthony Kaye offers a vivid portrait of slaves transforming adjoining plantations into slave neighborhoods. He describes men and women opening paths from their owners' plantations to adjacent farms to go courting and take spouses, to work, to run away, and to otherwise contend with owners and their agents. In the course of cultivating family ties, forging alliances, working, socializing, and storytelling, slaves fashioned their neighborhoods into the locus of slave society. Joining Places is the first book about slavery to use the pension files of former soldiers in the Union army, a vast source of rich testimony by ex-slaves. From these detailed accounts, Kaye tells the stories of men and women in love, "sweethearting," "taking up," "living together," and marrying across plantation lines; striving to get right with God; carving out neighborhoods as a terrain of struggle; and working to overthrow the slaveholders' regime. Kaye's depiction of slaves' sense of place in the Natchez District of Mississippi reveals a slave society that comprised not a single, monolithic community but an archipelago of many neighborhoods. Demonstrating that such neighborhoods prevailed across the South, he reformulates ideas about slave marriage, resistance, independent production, paternalism, autonomy, and the slave community that have defined decades of scholarship." -- Publisher description.
650 0 _aSlaves
_zMississippi
_zNatchez (District)
_xSocial life and customs.
650 0 _aSlaves
_zMississippi
_zNatchez (District)
_xSocial conditions.
650 0 _aCommunity life
_zMississippi
_zNatchez (District)
_xHistory.
650 0 _aNeighborhoods
_zMississippi
_zNatchez (District)
_xHistory.
650 0 _aAfrican American neighborhoods
_zMississippi
_zNatchez (District)
_xHistory.
651 0 _aNatchez (Miss. : District)
_xSocial life and customs.
651 0 _aNatchez (Miss. : District)
_xSocial conditions.
650 0 _aSlaves
_zSouthern States
_xSocial life and customs
_vCase studies.
650 0 _aSlaves
_zSouthern States
_xSocial conditions
_vCase studies.
650 0 _aCommunity life
_zSouthern States
_vCase studies.
776 0 8 _iOnline version:
_aKaye, Anthony E.
_tJoining places.
_dChapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2007
_w(OCoLC)603878592
776 0 8 _iOnline version:
_aKaye, Anthony E.
_tJoining places.
_dChapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2007
_w(OCoLC)608152109
830 0 _aJohn Hope Franklin series in African American history and culture.
942 _2lcc
_cBOOK
999 _c200000
_d204425